#August 2017, #Middle East

An Indian banker set to expand his start-up base to the UAE elaborates on the reasons behind this move.

Rubique is a FinTech company based in Mumbai. We offer a lending marketplace platform which provides individuals and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the country with frictionless access to a wide range financial services products including loans, credit cards and insurance products.

#August 2017, #Guest Columns

An industry expert explains the significance of Project exports to India’s growth agenda.

Project is an engineering venture or mission: a scheme of development work to be executed by employing the best technologies, continuous innovation and resources – human, financial and physical to create a capital asset. As technology advances, projects tend to move up in sector size as well as technological sophistication in the value-chain.

Project Exports, in essence, connotes setting up of projects overseas as construction and/or engineering projects. It could also involve the export of engineering consultancy or other engineering services as desired by the project owner. In simple terms, export of engineering goods/services on deferred payment terms which lead to execution of turnkey projects including civil construction works abroad are collectively referred to as Project Exports.

#Cover Feature/Auto, #August 2017

Tata Communications is at the heart of Formula 1 with a high-tech collaboration, writes a company insider.



F1 is the world’s most technologically advanced sport, and one where every millisecond matters. Whether it’s transmitting data from one of the hundreds of sensors on an F1 car back to the pits, or delivering the action in real-time via an online feed to millions of fans around the world, in this high-pressure, high-tech environment, superfast connectivity is critical.

#Putting it in context, #June 2017

Prime Minister Modi’s historic visit to Israel has set the course for core areas of collaboration between the two countries, writes India Inc. CEO Manoj Ladwa.

Historic, as we said last week, is a much misused word these days, but to describe Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s just concluded visit to Israel in any other way will be to miss the woods for the trees.

That’s because the two countries signed several agreements that can substantially change the lives of long-suffering class of Indians – farmers. It is not without reason that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said: “This is a marriage made in heaven; it is being celebrated on earth.”

Take the look at the range of the seven agreements signed:

  • Setting up an India-Israel Industrial R&D fund
  • Water conservation
  • Water utility reform in India
  • India-Israel Development Cooperation on Agriculture
  • Cooperation on atomic clocks
  • Setting up a Geo-Leo optical link
  • Cooperation on electric propulsion and small satellites

Notice: three of the seven agreements deal with water and agriculture development signaling that Modi is spending his hard-earned global goodwill on the uplift of Indian farmers.

Many of you may be unaware that significant parts of India are facing a water scarcity. In such a situation, Indian farmers must learn to grow greater amounts of crops using lesser amounts of water.

Israeli agricultural scientists have developed and mastered the science of drip irrigation, which has turned their once arid country – among the driest in the world – into a haven for farmers.

It is this technology that a government-to-government programme is transferring to Indian farmers to enable them to produce “more crop per drop”. The two countries have so far set up 15 Centres of Excellence in Agriculture as part of the India-Israel Agricultural Project, which is a three-way collaboration between the Government of India, the Government of Israel and an Indian state.

It is this collaboration that has enabled Indian farmers develop blooming mango orchards in semi-arid Haryana and thriving vegetable nurseries in the not-so-fertile regions of Gujarat.

These centres are also helping farmers in Bihar grow and improve yields of fruits such as lychee and mango, in Karnataka of pomegranates, mangoes and vegetables and in West Bengal of vegetables by providing seeds developed with the help of the latest agricultural technologies and by imparting knowledge on the best farming techniques, thereby, enabling Indian farmers to increase their incomes and improve their lives.

If the Modi-Netanyahu duo can facilitate this potentially dramatic change for half of India’s population, they will have changed the face of Indian society. Eleven more such centres will be built in future.

Then, an Israeli company will help clean a particularly dirty stretch of the River Yamuna where 8 km of sewage flows into the river and help restore the life of the now dying river.

Prime Minister Modi has promised to double farmer incomes by 2022. A much wider use of these latest Israeli farm technologies and procedures will almost certainly play a big role in helping the government meet that ambitious goal.

The visit also focussed on other core areas of concern to the two countries – such as security from terror and the deep defence relationship.

Here, to my mind are the five key takeaways from Modi’s visit to Israel:

  1. India and Israel agreed to elevate bilateral ties to the level of a strategic partnership, with a special focus on agricultural cooperation.
  2. The two sides agreed to protect each other’s strategic interests.
  3. The two Prime Ministers emphasised the importance of ensuring global peace. “Our talks focused on not just areas of bilateral opportunities but also how our cooperation can help cause of global peace and stability,” Modi said.
  4. Both nations will collaborate on cyber security and exchange knowledge and best practices to tackle terrorism in cyberspace.
  5. The personal chemistry that was evident between Modi and Netanyahu over the three days.

Manoj Ladwa is the founder of India Inc. and chief executive of MLS Chase Group @manojladwa

#June 2017, #Global Indian

Tel Aviv is the financial hub of Israel on the Mediterranean coastline. As the country’s tech hub, the city is known for its zest for life and as the place that never sleeps. Narendra Modi will become the first Indian Prime Minister to visit this city in July.

#INDIA-UK, #Special Edition – May 2017

A Dealmaker for the British government does some tough-talking to explain the secret behind clinching a good deal.

For the past decade as the UK government’s Dealmaker within UKTI’s [UK Trade and Investment] Global Entrepreneur Programme, I have been responsible for bringing the most innovative young companies from India, China and South East Asia to the UK. I have had an unusual insight into what help they need, and a lot of success in helping them do it, so I’ve put together some of my thoughts for those of you looking to make UK connections and secure that expansion deal.

#April 2017, #Sector Focus/IT

A tech expert traces India’s journey from an outsourcing hub of the 1990s to an innovation destination of today.

When I first became aware of the Indian tech sector in 1993, India would have been the least likely candidate to be named an innovation hub. Back then, and for many years, it was known more as a place where you could outsource your software development at low cost. Or in manufacturing, as the then secretary of department of electronics used to tell me, it was becoming known for ‘screwdriver assembly’, whereby product kits were imported and then assembled in India for either local consumption or re-export.

#April 2017, #Special Edition – May 2017, #INDIA-AFRICA, #Emerging Markets

India is a crucial partner for South Africa’s economy which offers enormous trade and investment opportunities, writes an expert from the region.

South Africa and India relations are enjoying an unprecedented renaissance, founded on shared economic interests and longstanding historical ties since the latter lifted economic sanctions against South Africa after the end of apartheid.

Both countries are major players in the global economy and share a common vision of shaping the development agenda through multilateral engagements such as the Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa (BRICS) and the India, Brazil, South Africa (IBSA), and other related platforms.

#April 2017, #Commonwealth

India holds the key to taking the Commonwealth lead in sustainable solutions for development.

We face an immense global challenge of developing sustainably. We know climate change already contributes to migration and conflict. Some Commonwealth countries are unable to generate the economic growth they badly need to become more resilient. In contrast, India has developed successfully into the world’s seventh largest economy, and third largest by purchasing power parity, hence increasingly a world leader in economic growth.

#April 2017, #Special Edition – May 2017, #Hotspot, #HOTSPOT

The northern part of the United Kingdom is making a strong case for Indian businesses to choose Scotland as a base for their UK expansion plans.

Scotland’s people are famous for the warmth of their welcome. Home to just over five million people, it is estimated that for every person living in Scotland, another five people living across the world have Scottish ancestry. With such close and extensive connections to every corner of the world, it is no wonder that overseas visitors to Scotland are made to feel like they are returning home!