#August 2017, #The Americas

Donald Trump’s ambivalence on economic and strategic issues concerning India is coming in the way of taking bilateral ties to the next level.

If India and the US were Facebook friends, then many in the Indian establishment would be justified in describing the relationship as “It’s complicated.”



India is a “major defence ally” of the US, the economic relationship is vibrant, at least on the face of it, Washington has reiterated its support for India to be admitted into the Nuclear Suppliers’ Group (NSG) as a full member and public statements by senior government officials on both sides continue to exude warmth.

#April 2017, #Sector Focus/IT

Automation in the global IT industry threatens to disrupt the sector in -India but it may be a blessing in heavy disguise. For the stagnant industry, robots may pave the way for the next round of growth.

On March 19, news reports suggested Cognizant, the New-Jersey headquartered software services firm may fire between 6,000-10,000 workers in its bid to reduce redundant and non-performing workers. As the news spread and doomsday predictions started ringing, the firm’s spokesperson sought to cool frayed nerves stating this was part of the company’s annual appraisal process when the bad apples are weeded out.

#February 2017, #India & China

An assertive China presents Prime Minister Modi with his most intractable foreign policy challenge, but there are indications that Beijing may be getting a little edgy.

China considered itself to be a rival of the US. In its world view, India was a regional player, at best the first among equals in South Asia.

David vs Goliath

In absolute terms, there is some merit in this argument. China’s $11.4-trillion economy, the world’s second largest, is five times India’s, which is world’s sixth largest, with a GDP of $2.3 trillion in 2016.

Last year, China’s per capita income, at $8,260, was five times the comparable figure of $1,718 for India. It is the world’s largest manufacturer of goods, its biggest trading nation and its military budget, at $131 billion is more than three times larger than India’s annual defence spending of $40 billion.

#February 2017, #The Americas

Just days after Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th US President, there is much upheaval around his series of unilateral executive orders. There is yet another draft reportedly awaiting his signature, which could hit Indian professionals hard.

American billionaire Donald J. Trump marked his first days in the Oval Office in characteristic style by signing some of the most controversial executive orders in history.

The suspension of the US refugee programme for 120 days and a cap on 2017 numbers came alongside a ban on anyone arriving from seven Muslim-majority countries – Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The instant effect was felt at airports in the US and around the world, as people were stopped from boarding US-bound flights or held when they landed in the US.

#US Election, #2016, #October 2016

Indian IT companies help US companies retain their global competitive edge. This is just one reason why it must roll back visa curbs on Indian IT professionals, argues ‘India Global Business’.

The trickle of bad news buffeting the Indian IT sector is slowly gaining critical mass. Infosys, Wipro and Cognizant, three leading software exporters, have cut their annual revenue guidance to 8.4 per cent from 12 per cent, citing macro-economic factors such as falling ticket sizes of deals, Brexit and a frustrating inability to scale up the skill sets of their workforce.

#2016, #October 2016, #Sector Focus

R. Chandrasekhar is the president of the National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM), the premier trade body for the Indian IT-BPO sector. In this exclusive interview with ‘India Global Business’, the former Secretary in the Indian government’s Department of Telecommunications delves into the trends in the industry, the future of robotics and how the Indian information technology sector can remain ahead of the curve.

#2016, #October 2016, #Sector Focus

The Indian IT sector must reskill its workforce and move up the value chain if it wants to retain its dominant position in the world as well as its double digit growth rates.

On July 15, 2016 a sombre looking Vishal Sikka, the CEO and MD of Infosys Ltd, India’s second largest exporter of IT services announced the company’s first quarterly results. While revenue and profit were below market expectations, what surprised many was the downward revision of annual revenue growth forecast. Markets were swift to mete out punishment. The shares of the company crashed by about 10 per cent in a single trading session, wiping out nearly $3.5 billion in market capitalisation.

#July/August 2016, #2016, #India-US

Indian companies, far from being job destroyers in the US, are actually net employment generators, writes India Inc. Consulting Editor.

Republican Party presidential nominee Donald Trump’s flip flops over H1B visas, which allow Indian IT pros to work in the US, show that large sections of the US are increasingly viewing protectionism as a panacea for its domestic economic problems, including joblessness, even as saner voices point to the positive contributions made by skilled migrants like Indian geeks.

#May/June 2016, #2016, #UK/EU

The Indian ICT industry has been a flag-bearer for the country, especially in the UK and Europe. NIIT Technologies, as a leading player in the field, is well placed to give an overview of the successes and challenges. The firm’s Europe in-charge weighs up the market, how it has evolved over the years and if the upcoming referendum on the UK’s membership of the European Union (EU) is likely to have any significant impact on the industry.