#2017/2016, #February 2017, #Emerging Markets

The comprehensive strategic partnership between New Delhi and Hanoi is playing an important role in ensuring balance of power in Asia

Rarely, if ever, does India weigh heavily on the minds of foreign leaders when they meet their counterparts from third countries. But when Chinese President Xi Jinping recently met Communist Party of Vietnam’s General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong in Beijing, seasoned observers could sense that New Delhi was the invisible elephant in the room.

#2017/2016, #February 2017, #Last Word

Outbound FDI from India will increasingly be driven by a need to fill knowledge and product gaps aimed at the domestic market.

Finance Minister Arun Jaitley has greased the wheels of the investment cycle with allocations of almost $90 billion for building roads, railway infrastructure, inland waterways, ports, airports and rural infrastructure for 2017-18. This massive public spending spree, marking a humungous increase over the figures for the current year, is expected to translate into large contracts for Indian and foreign companies.

#Putting it in context, #2017/2016, #February 2017

Donald Trump and his fellow travellers in Europe are doing their countries a disservice by recklessly pulling up the drawbridge on immigration.

Everyone knows that whenever their fortresses and castles came under siege, kings of old would pass the order to pull up the drawbridges and every able man would take up position to repel the invaders. And most of you will be familiar with the story of Don Quixote, the fictional medieval Spanish nobleman, who attacked windmills under the delusion that they were dangerous enemies.

Combine these two narratives and you get a very disturbing picture of the present and the future.

#2017/2016, #February 2017, #Go Global

One of India’s leading international businessmen traces the factors behind India’s natural instinct towards going global.

The question isn’t whether India can turn global; it is how quickly will India be accepted among the leading nations in the world.

Global trade and business is not new for India. The past is replete with examples of India’s contribution to world trade; in fact, India actually taught the world how to trade, be it spices or fibres or cotton yarn.
In the year when the British came into India – India as a single entity accounted for 21 per cent of world trade. Great Britain was then doing one per cent of world trade. In 1947, when it left India, Britain was doing 21 per cent world trade and India made up 1 per cent!

#2017/2016, #February 2017, #Go Global

India Inc. has envisioned its first-ever Go Global Expo & Conference 2017 as a hub for Indian companies on a decisive global expansion march as well as new start-ups ready for the leap. Here ‘India Global Business’ delves into the high-profile launch of the event in New Delhi.

There was a time barely two centuries ago, when India accounted for 21 per cent of global trade and Great Britain barely 1 per cent. At the height of the British Empire, this relative ratio had been turned on its head, with the United Kingdom as the most dominant trading nation in the world with more than a one-fifth share of world trade and India reduced to a peripheral player with only a 1 per cent share.

#2017/2016, #February 2017, #Global Indian

Pankaj Lal was among a handful of scientists to be honoured by outgoing US President Barack Obama with the Presidential Award. ‘India Global Business’ caught up with him to trace what led to this prestigious achievement and what being a Global Indian means to him.

What does an honour like the Presidential Award mean to you?

I am honoured and excited to receive this prestigious award. It’s always exciting for your peers to see the significant value in our work and for federal agencies to invest resources for this. This said, sharing the success with family, friends and students is the greatest reward.



Harnessing science for social good and developing sustainable energy and managing natural resources well are some of the grand challenges facing modern society, and I feel satisfied that that our work is contributing a bit towards improved understanding of this area. This award is a testament that hard work will be rewarded at the opportune moment, and will continue to keep me striving for more in the future.

#2017/2016, #Diplomat Corner, #February 2017

The new Indian high commissioner to the UK believes India and the UK can work together towards a win-win visa regime.

“In the field of IT, our professionals are renowned the world over. It is very important that our IT professionals can come and work and go back. They will contribute immensely not only to the local economy but also the global economy, which is what they are doing in Silicon Valley and the rest of the world,” says the Indian high commissioner to the UK, Y.K. Sinha.

#2017/2016, #UK/EUROPE, #February 2017

A new report released the UK’s Free Enterprise Group makes the case for Britain to prioritise free trade agreements (FTAs) with key Commonwealth nations like India following Brexit. ‘India Global Business’ explores the rationale behind this strategy.

‘Reconnecting with the Commonwealth: The UK’s free trade opportunities’, released by the British MPs led Free Enterprise Group, suggests a five-step plan for the UK government as it gets ready to leave the European Union (EU).

#2017/2016, #Hotspot, #February 2017

With Brexit around the corner, one of Britain’s neighbours is making a play for Indian investments as a member of the European Union (EU).

Ireland has a strong proposition for any company choosing to do business in Europe. A part of the European Union (EU), the country’s impressive offering includes large and small companies, MNCs and indigenous companies, universities and research institutes in the technology, ICT, life-sciences, financial services and advanced manufacturing sectors.

#2017/2016, #February 2017, #Emerging Markets

Parag Saxena is the CEO of New Silk Route Partners, one of India’s largest Private Equity (PE) funds with a primary focus on India and the Southeast Asia markets. He tells ‘India Global Business’ about the company’s journey since inception in 2006 to becoming a leading Asia-focused growth capital firm with $1.4 billion under management.

How is New Silk Route contributing to the Indian growth story?

New Silk Route was formed with the belief that as India’s GDP per capita grows, the scope to fulfil the basic needs of the country’s large part population will also grow. Our investments have therefore been structured around themes that meet these various needs.

We have a million people graduating every month. If we don’t find good jobs for them, we will turn what the world regards as our demographic dividend into a demographic disaster. Education and skill development is a crucial theme for us.

In our fund right now, we have one of the largest companies in the tutoring business. They tutor children for medical school and engineering entrance examinations. The period that we have been an investor in the company in the last five years or so, they have significantly increased the number of students that they are providing services to – now nearly half a million. And, the company itself is succeeding and is one of the major successes of our portfolio.

Skill development is a very frequently used word but not enough is being done about it.