#Cover Story, #June 2017

When Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi visits Israel in July, not only will he be bringing the otherwise warm relationship between the two countries out of the closet, he will also be marking the 25th anniversary of the establishment of formal and full-fledged diplomatic relations between the two countries.

Modi’s visit, the first by an Indian Prime Minister to Israel, also marks the decisive de-hyphening of the relationship with India’s traditional support for the Palestine cause. Modi will not be visiting Palestine to “balance” India’s perceived tilt towards the Jewish state. This is causing angst among India’s chic left-wing ivory tower intellectuals who had, till recently, dictated India’s Middle East policy and aligned it firmly with Palestine’s interests.

#Cover Story, #June 2017

The Indian Ambassador based in Tel Aviv, Pavan Kapoor, is well-placed to provide some context to Narendra Modi’s historic visit to Israel in July – the first by an Indian Prime Minister.

Please give us an overview of where Indo-Israel ties stand.

I think India-Israel relations are on a very good wicket, at the political and economic level and also the cultural and people to people level. We have not had this scale of high level contact between the two countries for many years. In the last couple of years, we have had Heads of State visiting from India and Israel and we have had several ministerial delegations on either side.

#June 2017, #Emerging Markets

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s policy of renewing and redefining India’s millennia-old civilisational bonds with the Middle East are bearing concrete fruit in the form of strategic alliances and investments in India’s infrastructure sector.

Mention the Middle East to an Indian and he will immediately associate it with oil, deserts, Dubai and, very possibly, a non-resident relative stationed there. None of the above provides a misleading picture of the region; equally, none of them paints the complete picture either.

#June 2017, #Emerging Markets

India has historically had close economic ties with the Arabian Peninsula, especially the Gulf region along its eastern shores, writes a banking expert.

The first historically recorded maritime trade route in the world was, in fact, between the Indus Valley civilisation and the civilisation of Dilmun, which was located on the island of Bahrain and the adjacent shore of Saudi Arabia. Goods, including cotton and spices, were acquired by merchants from Dilmun.

#April 2017, #Sector Focus/IT

Cyber Security is the protection of information assets, which are highly valuable to an organisation, writes a security expert.



In the early days of the internet, Cyber Security wasn’t of importance since most computers linked to the internet were part of academia, where trust played a major role. In addition, traditional networking wasn’t secure by design, and did not encompass elements of security.

As the internet grew, organisations started realising the efficiency and productivity the internet brought, and applications and software were developed. The vast repository of information, and ability to cause damage sitting anywhere in the world, led to a proliferation in the number of cyber attacks.

#February 2017, #Emerging Markets

The comprehensive strategic partnership between New Delhi and Hanoi is playing an important role in ensuring balance of power in Asia

Rarely, if ever, does India weigh heavily on the minds of foreign leaders when they meet their counterparts from third countries. But when Chinese President Xi Jinping recently met Communist Party of Vietnam’s General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong in Beijing, seasoned observers could sense that New Delhi was the invisible elephant in the room.

#2016, #Yearend 2016, #World View

Russia remains India’s largest supplier of defence and strategic equipment. It is important the relationship strengthens in other areas too to avoid a slow burnout.

The Russian Ambassador to New Delhi said all the right things. Russia, he insisted, remained India’s BFF (best friend forever for the uninitiated) despite its recent flirtation with Pakistan. But it will take a lot more than mere protestations of undying love to convince New Delhi that its ties with Moscow are still what they were at the peak of the Indo-Soviet romance during the Cold War.