#April 2017, #Special Edition – May 2017, #INDIA-AFRICA, #Emerging Markets

India is a crucial partner for South Africa’s economy which offers enormous trade and investment opportunities, writes an expert from the region.

South Africa and India relations are enjoying an unprecedented renaissance, founded on shared economic interests and longstanding historical ties since the latter lifted economic sanctions against South Africa after the end of apartheid.

Both countries are major players in the global economy and share a common vision of shaping the development agenda through multilateral engagements such as the Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa (BRICS) and the India, Brazil, South Africa (IBSA), and other related platforms.

#April 2017, #Commonwealth, #Special Edition – May 2017, #COMMONWEALTH

It is time for the Commonwealth to introspect on its role for the 21st century and look at adding new members and acquiring a sharper financial focus.

As a British citizen of Indian origin born in Uganda, I enjoy a triple connection with the Commonwealth. I was therefore drawn towards speaking in a recent debate on the Commonwealth in the House of Lords — almost like a magnetic field.

#February 2017, #India & China

An assertive China presents Prime Minister Modi with his most intractable foreign policy challenge, but there are indications that Beijing may be getting a little edgy.

China considered itself to be a rival of the US. In its world view, India was a regional player, at best the first among equals in South Asia.

David vs Goliath

In absolute terms, there is some merit in this argument. China’s $11.4-trillion economy, the world’s second largest, is five times India’s, which is world’s sixth largest, with a GDP of $2.3 trillion in 2016.

Last year, China’s per capita income, at $8,260, was five times the comparable figure of $1,718 for India. It is the world’s largest manufacturer of goods, its biggest trading nation and its military budget, at $131 billion is more than three times larger than India’s annual defence spending of $40 billion.

#2016, #Yearend 2016, #World View

The underlying mood may be tetchy, but overall India-China relations covered some important ground in 2016.

In 2016, particularly following the Nuclear Suppliers’ Group (NSG) plenary in Seoul in June, India-China relations became decidedly testy. Several reasons were attributed to this and it is possible all of them had a bearing on the outcome. Critics of the Indian government’s attempt to gain acceptance as a full member of the NSG blamed that motivation. They argued the bid was premature and grossly underestimated the Chinese ability to veto India’s entry, or Beijing’s ability to stand up to a request from Washington DC.