#2016, #Yearend 2016, #World View

Indian companies are collectively the third largest foreign investor in the UK and the largest employer in its manufacturing sector. Then, Indian IT companies employ about 100,000 US citizens in that country. No wonder countries across the world are inviting Indian companies to invest in them and are laying out the red carpet for them.

Indians have seen senior government functionaries from the Prime Minister downwards hard selling India as a an ideal destination for FDI from the West, China, Japan, South Korea and the ASEAN. But even as the PM and his council of ministers woo foreign investments, the developed countries of the West as well as many others are actively courting the movers and shakers of India Inc to invest in their countries.

#2016, #Yearend 2016, #South Asia

India’s bilateral trade with Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam has grown exponentially from $460 million in 2000 to almost $12 billion in 2014.

Till recently, they were considered the poor cousins of ASEAN’s more prosperous members, but the four countries – Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam – known by the acronym CLMV have emerged as the new cynosure of investors’ eyes –both for their economic potential as well as for their strategic value.

#2016, #Yearend 2016, #South Asia

India’s proactive Act East policy hinges heavily on the ASEAN free trade group and it is the many emerging economies in this collective that offer growth opportunities for Indian companies.

The Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) comprises of the Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam. India’s focus on a strengthened and multi-faceted relationship with ASEAN was reinvigorated at the 12th ASEAN India Summit in Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar, in November 2014, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi formally flagged up the Act East Policy.

#2016, #Yearend 2016, #South Asia

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, with whom Modi shares close ties, is close to becoming India’s “all weather friend”.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has spoken of the “Arc of Democracy”, with Tokyo and New Delhi as its two ends and encompassing the ASEAN, Australia and South Korea in between as the ideal architecture for the 21st century, which many have already dubbed Asia’s century.

#2016, #Yearend 2016, #World View

A leading Indian diplomat based in Africa shares his views on why the continent is important to India.



Any observer of Indian foreign and strategic policy may well raise the question: Why Africa? Why should a developing country like India expend its limited political, diplomatic, human and financial resources on Africa when there are myriad problems to be resolved within the country. Moreover, given India’s limited resources spent primarily cultivating the P-5 and other great powers like Germany and Japan, our immediate neighbourhood (SAARC, ASEAN, CIS) and on crucial multilateral systems like the UN, why should the country’s initiatives be spread thinly across the 54 countries that make up continental Africa.

#2016, #Yearend 2016, #South Asia

Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam (CLMV) collectively hold a lot of promise for Indian companies, both as a market and source of raw materials.

Most Indians are quite familiar with Vietnam. Apart from etching itself into the India’s (and the world’s) collective consciousness for its heroic and successful fight against a superpower in the 1960s and 1970s, it has also emerged recently as a close Indian ally in South East Asia against a new Chinese assertiveness.

#2016, #October 2016, #Emerging Markets

Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam, a sub-bloc within ASEAN, are all former socialist economies transitioning to the market. India can help this process and increase its economic and strategic footprint across South East Asia.

The acronym CLMV would have elicited blank or quizzical looks at most gatherings even a few years ago. It is still not the stuff of regular cocktail circuit chatter, but many more people now know that it stands for Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam.
Many will also know that these countries, all part of the ASEAN, also make up a sub-group that is of particular economic and strategic interest to India.

#2016, #October 2016, #Emerging Markets

Organised by the Delhi-based think-tank India Foundation in Singapore, the Indian Ocean Conference of September 2016 sought to locate India in the midst of the ocean that bears its name. ‘India Global Business’ presents a report from the scene.

India’s relationship with the Indian Ocean is political, cultural and economic, historical and contemporary. Its essence can be captured by the following statistics: of all of India’s international trade, 90 per cent by volume and 70 per cent by value moves across the ocean.

#July/August 2016, #Trade Wars, #2016

As India takes its place as the fastest growing economy within the global economic order, it is about time the government looked at appointing a dedicated “Indian Trade Representative”, argues India Inc. CEO.

Does India need a dedicated office of a Trade Representative (TR) akin to the United States Trade Representative (USTR)? India has ongoing bilateral and multilateral trade negotiations with the European Union, Thailand, Asean and the Gulf Cooperation Council, among more than a dozen countries and blocs. Then, it has, at last count, at least 45 trade disputes with…